Comfort or Freedom? Closed vs Open Software.

BCM 206

Comfort OR Freedom FLOWERFIED

Closed vs Open sourced software… a debate that has often been narrowed down to the two powerhouses of mobile technology; iOS vs Android. This week we discussed the differences, the benefits and the limitations of open and closed source software. Here are the main differences between the two:

Closed (iOS)

-Apple has total control of iOS

-iOS controls, monitors, censors, and can remove any and all apps on the app store

-Only Apple developers can work on iOS

-There is only one hardware manufacturer; Apple

Open (Android)

-Google gave away the Android coding for free

-Allows for independent app markets

-Many independent app developers contribute to Android

-There are many competing Android manufacturers; including- Samsung, Motorola, HTC, LG, Xiaomi, and more!

Ted ended the lecture for this week asking us to think about what was more important. Having the comfort of the easy to use interface of the closed software. Or having the freedom to make your own choices with the open software. This is the idea that I based my remediation on for the week.

As you may recognise, I decided to add to my walled garden remediation from last week by using it as the example of closed software, otherwise known as the ‘comfort.’ I then expanded on this remediation and imagined what the same image would look like as a representation of open software, or ‘freedom.’

Let me know- Are you an Apple or Android user? And has this blog post changed your perspective about it!?

applevandroid

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7 thoughts on “Comfort or Freedom? Closed vs Open Software.

  1. Hi, nice post!

    It’s an interesting topical debate this day and age about which device people use. Me personally I am an Apple user and have been since early high school days, but reading your blog and watching the lecture, I have understood more clearly what Google’s goal is with their Android devices and what they are trying to achieve.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hey Emma, nice remediation! I myself am an Apple girl. And the reason for this as you’ve stated I think, is most definitely the comfort. The comfort of knowing how to use the easy devices oppose to changing it up. Although you’d think, being closed, the privacy and security is secured, but things like the iCloud breach in 2014 prove otherwise. I do like how Android users have the option for a more free and open device which allows for independent creators to share their apps to the public. But is there any downfalls to Android being so open?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Emma,
    Your post was very informative and straight to the point; a great way to get your audience to be more involved with your work!
    I’ve always been an Apple user and I’m starting to think it may be because I never knew about Android being an open source, with so much freedom. Apple has been really easy to use and when I get handed an Android I freak out because I don’t know how to use it.
    It makes a lot of sense as to why businesses are using the open source for their companies, allowing them to make their own choices but I do wonder if there are any possible issues with an open source…

    Great post!
    – Em x

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Hey Emma,
    Your remediation is so cute! It also definitely explains the differences between the two different philosophies of open and closed platforms quite clearly.
    I myself am an apple user, primarily for comfort and also because for myself I have no need to modify anything in terms of the platform, software etc. Also, learning where everything is and how everything works with Android is a very trying process, which is why I lean towards Apple.
    Great post, I enjoyed reading it.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Hi Emma, I am an Apple user, which is an iOS user. It is absolutely comfortable for me. For me, close software can effectively block the binding of some rogue software, and Apple’s control can well prevent some malicious competition. Your remediation is great and is a good blog.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Like you said, having the comfort of the easy to use interface of the closed software, or having the freedom to make your own choices with the open software ultimately defines our choice in which phone we lean towards. One notable idea that comes to mind is that many people choose mobile phones by the ‘aesthetic’ of what it looks like. Think of how slick and ‘lush’ an iPhone is. The amount of celebrities that have iPhones that we aspire to be like. Do you think we make our decisions based on the comfort of knowing others have it? That if we have an iPhone, we’re more ‘in’ with the crowd and that’s what’s comfortable? A phone should represent freedom in what you’re allowed to do, you shouldn’t be limited in what you’re allowed to access. The want for creativity and innovation is much higher than it used to be which is highlighted through Android.

    So, if we know all of this, why do we still have such a want for an iPhone?

    Here’s an interesting article describing why people love it so much https://www.techradar.com/au/news/7-reasons-why-do-people-love-apple-products

    Overall your blog was great and your remediation supports your content clearly. My only advice would be to watch your word count as we have a limit of 150 words but I understand that it can be difficult to keep within the limit sometimes.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Hi Emma!
    I definitely value the comfort of an iPhone because of its simplicity. Any little issue can be Googled within seconds, and if the Internet can’t solve it, the Apple store will. While I think companies who use open sourcing are smart because it allows consumers to tweak and customise their phone in the way they wish, what does this say about security? if anyone is able to change the software and hardware, can anyone breach security and release information? Online privacy has become a recurring topic in recent years and it’s something more being are becoming conscious about.

    Informative read and your remediation is so cute!

    Liked by 1 person

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